New Dressage Association Inc.

 

Scholarship Programs

 NEWDA supports riders who wish to further their riding education! In order to help these riders we have set-up scholarship programs to support them. Feel free to check out our Scholarship programs and contact us with any questions. More information can be found in the downloadable scholarship guides.

Would you like to donate to on of our Scholarship Programs? You can now easily donate through PayPal using the Donate  button to the right.

Adult Amateur Scholarship

This scholarship is designed to enhance the education of NEWDA members, who are Adult Amateur’s as defined by the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF), and who wish to pursue continued dressage education through clinics, symposiums, seminars and other educational programs sponsored by either USEF, USDF, and/or NEWDA.

 Professionals Scholarship

This scholarship is designed to enhance the education of NEWDA members, who are Professional’s as defined by the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF), and who wish to pursue continued dressage education through clinics, symposiums, seminars and other educational programs sponsored by either USEF, USDF, and/or NEWDA.

Gail Angell Junior/Young Rider Scholarship

This scholarship is designed to enhance the education of NEWDA Junior/Young Riders who are pursuing their dressage through clinics, symposiums, USEF, USDF/NEWDA sanctioned education programs.

2017 Scholarship Letter from Bree Armbrust

Hello Everyone,

Thank you so much for awarding me the Gail Angell Junior/Young Rider scholarship.

I survived Pony Club Champs and Festival it was amazing experience. I apologize that it has taken me so long to update you all on my experience at festival,summer has just flown by!

My experience in Kentucky began with Championships. Championships went well although Cooper

"my partner" was just not himself from the moment we unloaded him, by Wednesday night we found out why, which was my first lesson in horse health. After our competition ride on Wednesday I cold hosed him, dried him off., walked him, poulticed his legs, gave him fresh hay and water with Gatorade along with a bucket of just plain water to dunk his hay in, which is his favorite thing to do. I then watched my teammates compete after which before going to eat I checked on Cooper. About a hour later I went to feed and give fresh water for the evening before heading to bed to find Cooper drenched. I took him out of the stall and his temperature was 107. Needless to say I phoned a vet. While I waited I gave him a alcohol bath. When the vet arrived I learned alot about heat stress. I always thought if a horse was eating and drinking this would not happen but it does. The vet was a great teacher and we had him competing the next day.

Our ( Cooper and myself) first clinic was a ground clinic taught by Lisa Rakes of the Mounted Police. During this session we worked on ground manners with our mounts in hand to begin with. Once our partners were comfortable with the different courses with obstacles we mounted walking through the courses. I am using alot of what I learned from this clinic with my three year old gelding.

After lunch we went to a show jump clinic taught by Janet McCune. This clinic was held in one of the large jump arenas that I had not ridden in for Championships. My take away from this clinic was to look where you are traveling making sure your horse has landed after the jump not before. I have always been taught to look to and over the next fence and although I tried this in the clinic I have found that the way I had been doing this works better for us .

I awoke the next day at zero o'clock thirty to arrive at the horse park at 5 am to feed and take care of Cooper so we could arrive at 6am on the cross country field for a Fox Hunt. This was to be a fun learning experience on Fox Hunting. The only component of the Fox Hunt missing was the Fox. I am sure my partner enjoyed this experience the most! As long as we stayed behind the dogs and Master he could just run up and down the hills on the cross country field of the Kentucky Horse Park.

Bobby Dreyer was my second Show Jumping clinician. I diffidently learned as well as have used what he taught me the most. We talked a lot about the quality of the canter approaching a jump as well as balancing using your outside rein and leg. How to work on lead changes after the jump using inside leg rein but not forgetting about the outside. The use of the rein back aid in the canter to engage the hind end.

I also choose to attend a Cross Country clinic which was taught by Richard Lamb.

He stressed the importance of not running at the jumps cross country while also not holding, allowing your horse to move forward ,using the room to circle if you need to slow down , balance and planning your ride.

Thank you so much for your support in getting to Kentucky for all the clinics. In every clinic we attended we learned something. Not only do I practice the things I have learned that work for us I also

have share them with others.

I have enclosed a few pictures from Show Jumping competition ,Fox Hunt, Ground Training and Cross Country.

Sincerely,

Bree Armbrust

Click above to read an article about Gail.

Photos from Bree Armbrust

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